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Secondary analyses using APMS data

Papers
Published: January 2007

Cigarette smoking & mental health
People with a mental disorder are more likely to smoke, according to secondary analysis of the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) 2007.

Smoking rates vary with type of disorder
Smoking rates varied with type of common mental disorder (CMD) and were highest among people with depression (37%) and phobias (37%). The likelihood of being a smoker was higher still among people with probable psychosis (40%), alcohol dependence (46%) and illicit drug dependence (69%, non-age-standardised estimate). 57% of people who had attempted suicide in the past year were smokers.

People with a mental disorder account for a disproportionate amount of cigarettes smoked
Taking an inclusive definition of mental disorder, which includes people with alcohol or illicit drug dependence and less common conditions such as psychosis, about 42% of all cigarettes smoked by the English general population are smoked by people with a mental disorder. Those with a common mental disorder (CMD) are the largest group, accounting for about a sixth of the population and about a third of all cigarettes smoked.

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