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British Gambling Prevalence Survey

Money and dice

Aim

The British Gambling Prevalence Survey looks at participation in all forms of gambling, from the National Lottery to casinos. It estimates the level of problem gambling in Britain and since 2007 has provided information about what people think about gambling.

The most recent survey took place in 2010 and builds on two previous rounds in 1999 and 2007.

Findings

The majority of people gamble at least once a year (73% of the population) and more people are gambling more often.

Most people who gamble do so because it's fun and for the chance of winning 'big money'.

The largest increase in gambling occurred among women, where rates have increased from 65% in 2007 to 71% in 2010.

Men are still more likely than women to gamble, but more women than before buy scratchcards (25%), take part in other lotteries (25%), play slot machines (10%) and gamble online on bingo, casino or  slot machine style games (4%).

Attitudes towards gambling are changing and whilst generally negative, they are  significantly more positive than previously.

Most people think gambling is harmful, but that people have a right to gamble if they want to and reject the idea of prohibition.

In 2010, between 0.7% - 0.9% of adults aged 16 and over were 'problem' gamblers.

Around 7% of adults are at-risk of experiencing problems with their gambling.

3.5 million adults are showing some signs of difficulties with their gambling. These people are either problem gamblers or at risk of experiencing problems with their gambling.

Methodology

The survey is a nationally representative survey of adults aged 16 and over in private households.

Read 2010 report

Read 2007 report

Read 1999 report