Menu
 

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

You are on the Natcen site

Click here for Scotcen

natcen map

Scottish Social Attitudes 2019: Intra-household distribution of resources

iStock-1158702105
Published: October 2020

Scottish Social Attitudes (SSA) has been measuring and tracking changes in people’s social, political and moral attitudes in Scotland since 1999. The survey is a critical gauge of public opinion, and is used by the Government, journalists, opinion formers and academics.

This study was commissioned by the Scottish Government and conducted as part of the 2019 Scottish Social Attitudes survey. The report examines:

  • How do couples who live together organise their financial income between them?
  • How do couples who live together divide decision-making on spending, and whose money is used for different types of expenditure?
  • What restrictions exist in people’s everyday living due to a lack of money or resources?

Findings

  • Two-fifths (40%) of people living with a partner keep none of their own income and put all of it into a joint pool, while a fifth (20%) keep all (or almost all) of their own income and put none of it into a joint pool.
  • Decisions on how much to spend on larger household items, such as a TV or fridge, were more likely to be made by both partners (73%) than decisions on how much to spend on regular grocery shopping (43%).
  • Just over half (55%) of those living with a partner said it was both themselves and their partner who were responsible for ensuring the household does not live beyond its means.
  • A fifth (20%) of people in Scotland said they would have to save up before buying a new pair of everyday shoes and a similar proportion (18%) said that during the past 12 months there was a time when they ‘ate less than they thought they should because of a lack of money’.
  • One in ten people (10%) said that they had to stay at home and not go out ‘very often’ because they could not afford it, with the same proportion saying they were unable to have a regular hobby or leisure activity because of a lack of money.

Methodology

Scottish Social Attitudes is an annual survey that has been run since 1999 – this year marked its twentieth anniversary. It is a face-to-face survey that uses a random sample of all those aged over 16 and living anywhere in Scotland, so it provides a robust and reliable picture of changing attitudes over time. This year 1,022 people took part from across Scotland.

Download from the ScotGov website