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Working from home and mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

Woman working out finances
Published: July 2021

The third output of this research project is a briefing paper investigating whether working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with increased mental distress amongst employees across the UK, and how this relates to social isolation and financial difficulties.

Findings

  • People who worked from home while living alone reported larger increases in mental distress than other workers at the start of the pandemic.
  • Working from home was associated with larger increases in mental distress even as these working arrangements became the “new normal”; when controlling for people’s demographic characteristics, financial circumstances and loneliness, changes in mental distress were significantly higher for those working at home, regardless of their living circumstances in May, July and November 2020.
  • Financial difficulties were more common among those who could not work from home, whereas social isolation was felt more among people living alone, regardless of their work arrangement. This suggests there are different routes through which population mental health has been impacted during the pandemic and there is no single remedy to address these issues.

About the research

This research investigates how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted people’s mental health and financial situation, and how this differs among different groups of the UK population.

Find out more about the research project here.

Download the briefing paper

Download the data tables