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Scottish Social Attitudes

Man in kilt

Visit our 
new website to read the latest report:

SSA Homepage

What is it?

Used by the Government, journalists, opinion formers and academics, Scottish Social Attitudes is the gold standard survey series measuring and tracking changes in people's social, political and moral attitudes in Scotland.


Since 1999 we've been  interviewing members of the public to find out what they think about key issues in Scotland covering a wide range of topics and issues.

We're a charity and we want our research to reach as many organisations trying to improve life in Scotland the UK as possible.

That's why ScotCen's Scottish Social Attitudes is freely available online.

New findings from 2014


Attitudes to violence against women in Scotland


Public Attitudes to Dementia (see separate executive summary here)

Public Attitudes to Sectarianism in Scotland

Has the Referendum Campaign Made a Difference? 

Minding the gap – women’s views of independence in 2014 

2013 findings

Attitudes to Mental Health in Scotland (seperate exec. summary available here)

Core module – attitudes to government, the economy, health and social care services, and social capital in Scotland

Attitudes towards alcohol in Scotland

Who will turn up and who will stay at home?

So where does Scotland stand on more devolution? 

The score at half time: Trends in support for Independence  

The Undecideds: Don't care or deeply conflicted?

Is it really all about economics? Issues of nationhood and welfare

To view the data for 2013 please visit WhatScotlandThinks

You can view earlier reports by year and by topic by following the links below. 


Scottish Social Attitudes is run by ScotCen Social Research and is made possible by the funding we receive from a variety of charitable and governmental sources each year.


Every year, we ask 1,200 - 1,500 people to take part in Scottish Social Attitudes on the basis of random probability sampling.

This technique ensures that everyone has an equal chance of being picked to take part, so the results are representative of the Scottish population.

And because we repeat many of the same questions over time, we're able to identify real changes in people's social attitudes.